the child grows enormous but never grows up
Flaubert once dreamed of writing a book about nothing, a book without content, ‘a book that would be held together by itself, by the internal force of its style just as the Earth is suspended in the air without any support.’
Georgi Gospodinov, Natural Novel  (via mythologyofblue)
A truly radical book might have left readers feeling more challenged by the past, less quick to pass judgment and more able to find value in ways of life alien to their own.
laphamsquarterly:

We love Cabinet Magazine at LQ, and think of them as our artsier, fartsier sibling. Pre-order now!
standardgrey:

 // Curiosity and Method: Ten Years of Cabinet Magazine
This looks handsome.
So handsome that I pre-ordered it. Should be showing up in January.
I had to get rid of my Cabinets before I moved (Hope you’re enjoying them, Jillo!), here’s hoping I can get some of my favourite bits back.

laphamsquarterly:

We love Cabinet Magazine at LQ, and think of them as our artsier, fartsier sibling. Pre-order now!

standardgrey:

 // Curiosity and Method: Ten Years of Cabinet Magazine

This looks handsome.

So handsome that I pre-ordered it. Should be showing up in January.

I had to get rid of my Cabinets before I moved (Hope you’re enjoying them, Jillo!), here’s hoping I can get some of my favourite bits back.

mwfrost:

First, digitization is a spectrum, not a condition. There’s no one point at which information switches from analog to digital, just as there’s no single format that which is abstractly ‘computer readable’. It’s tempting to draw a bright line at digitization, and to have it separate the old and the modern, the virtual and the real. But the history of digitization stretches much farther back than we might think.
Sapping Attention: Logbooks and the long history of digitization

mwfrost:

First, digitization is a spectrum, not a condition. There’s no one point at which information switches from analog to digital, just as there’s no single format that which is abstractly ‘computer readable’. It’s tempting to draw a bright line at digitization, and to have it separate the old and the modern, the virtual and the real. But the history of digitization stretches much farther back than we might think.

Sapping Attention: Logbooks and the long history of digitization

mudwerks:

(via MAKE | Paperback Book Color Wheel)
Jonathan Whitfill 
thingsmagazine:

Swedish scrap book, c.1890

libraryjournal:

skylightbooks:

Eric Yahnker: 99 Rises/100 Falls, 2008, 99 Books with “The Rise and Fall of…” in title, dimensions variable 

I wonder about the history of the phrase “Rise and Fall.” I always misremember Gibbon’s mammoth Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire as the Rise and Fall, which it most certain isn’t (it’d be 12 brick-sized volumes instead of six).

According to Google Ngram, the use of the phrase “Rise and Fall” just started picking up after 1800 before skyrocketing in (relative) popularity in the late 20th century. Since then, the phrase, it seems, has already begun its decline.

picturedept:

The Art of Google Books

Somewhere between medieval marginalia and the Google Street View based works of Jon Rafman and Doug Rickard lies The Art of Google Books.

The manuscript digitization process, along with the gestures of the scanning archivist’s hand, and the idiosynchracies of the printed page, can occasionally lead to strange and beautiful new images—”re-photographs” as described by Krissy Wilson, the creator of the blog.

The rephotography I am talking about is what happens when you take a photograph of a photograph — the idea that, were one to take a photo of the Mona Lisa, you would not have a copy of the Mona Lisa, but a photograph, authored by the photographer. I see the images produced by Google Books employees as photographs, in that sense.

The above is a selection of recent discoveries:
1. Marble paper endsheets, from the Bavarian State Library, digitized January 26, 2010.
2. “Poor scanning creates text whirlpool,” from Oxford University, digitized August 2, 2006.
3. Hand Transit, via microecos.
4. Extreme text-stretch, submitted by microscopic.
5. “Who is to blame (for this distortion)?” from the University of California, digitized July 13, 2007.
6. Armand Seguin, Les fleurs du mal, 1892, as found on the digital cover of Dario Gamboni’s Potential images: ambiguity and indeterminacy in modern art, via mythologyofblue.
7. Elaborately designed endpapers digitized in high contrast, from the University of Michigan, digitized May 29, 2007.
8. “Apparently the front and back cover of the book.” from the Bavarian State Library, digitized September 27, 2011.
9. Intermittent autolinking on the title page, from the Bavarian State Library, digitized February 6, 2012.
10. Aurora Borealis plate with neon color distortion, from the New York Public Library, digitized February 2, 2009.

To submit your own “unexpected peculiarities” found in Google Books, or to browse the archive beyond the above selection, visit theartofgooglebooks.tumblr.com.

nevver:

The Marber Grid (1961), Penguin book covers

nevver:

The Marber Grid (1961), Penguin book covers

areasofmyexpertise:

Further proof that Jon Hamm and I are basically identical.

(in the studio for THAT IS ALL, the audioback edition)

areasofmyexpertise:

Further proof that Jon Hamm and I are basically identical.

(in the studio for THAT IS ALL, the audioback edition)

newmanology:

A Professional Guide to Photographing the Sun, paperback book (1970s)
Source: Vintage Paperbacks

newmanology:

A Professional Guide to Photographing the Sun, paperback book (1970s)

Source: Vintage Paperbacks

David Foster Wallace’s personal library at the Harry Ransom Center.