the child grows enormous but never grows up
If I ruled the world, or at least a publishing company, all books would contain as much supplementary information as possible. Nonfiction, fiction—doesn’t matter. Every work would have an appendix filled with diagrams, background information, digressions and anecdata. And of course, maps. Lots and lots of maps
slabbb-blockkk-hilarious:


From G. Mackenzie Bacon’s On the Writing of the Insane, with Illustrations (1870).
chrismohney:

retroturbo:

Wandl The Invader

This looks less like an invasion and more like an awkward accidental encounter between former acquaintances or something. “Oh, so … you work here now too?” etc.

chrismohney:

retroturbo:

Wandl The Invader

This looks less like an invasion and more like an awkward accidental encounter between former acquaintances or something. “Oh, so … you work here now too?” etc.

wallacegardens:


2012. Year of the Dragon. 
Illustration by Ulisse Aldrovandi, from his opus magnus Historia serpentum et draconum (1640) 

wallacegardens:

2012. Year of the Dragon. 

Illustration by Ulisse Aldrovandi, from his opus magnus Historia serpentum et draconum (1640) 

essayist:

Donald Barthelme’s Syllabus

by Kevin Moffett

There was a time when I fought against an impatience with reading, concealing, with partisanship, the fissures in my education. I confused difficulty with duplicity, and that which didn’t come easily, I often scorned. Then, in my last year of college in Gainesville, Florida, I was given secondhand a list of eighty-one books, the recommendations of Donald Barthelme to his students. Barthelme’s only guidance, passed on by Padgett Powell, one of Barthelme’s former students at the University of Houston and my teacher at the time,was to attack the books “in no particular order, just read them,” which is exactly what I, in my confident illiteracy, resolved to do.

But first I had to find the books, a search that began at Gainesville’s Friends of the Library warehouse book sale. Early morning, the warehouse parking lot was filled with about fifty men, women, and children waiting for the doors to open. At the front of the line were the all-nighters, hard-core sci-fi fans, amateur Civil War historians, and chasers of obscurities, rumored to have been there since before midnight. Some had brought with them hibachis and coolers and battery-powered radios, giving the parking lot the feel of a Gator football pre-game with less angry hope.


Astronomical is a scale model of our solar system in twelve 500 page volumes  printed-on-demand. On page 1 the Sun, on page 6,000 Pluto. The width of  each page equals one million kilometres. - by Mishka Henner//via olena

Astronomical is a scale model of our solar system in twelve 500 page volumes printed-on-demand. On page 1 the Sun, on page 6,000 Pluto. The width of each page equals one million kilometres. - by Mishka Henner

//via olena

lustik:

Gilles cut encyclopaedia - Alexander Korzer Robinson

lustik:

Gilles cut encyclopaedia - Alexander Korzer Robinson

proustitute:

Selena Kimball, Inferno | O. The contents of the 1948 print edition of Dante’s Inferno. Illustrated by Gustav Dore, 35” x 37”, 2009.(via artchipel) 

proustitute:

Selena KimballInferno | O. The contents of the 1948 print edition of Dante’s Inferno. Illustrated by Gustav Dore, 35” x 37”, 2009.

(via artchipel

Stability is good when a society is peaceful and prosperous. Stability is evil when a society is poor and oppressed.
Freeman Dyson reviews legendary psychologist and Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman’s new book, Thinking, Fast and Slow a must-read (via curiositycounts)
“Black Friday” by Daniel Clowes

“Black Friday” by Daniel Clowes