the child grows enormous but never grows up

Installation (by Henrique Oliveira)

likeafieldmouse:

Bai Yiluo - Civilization (2007)

philamuseum:

Please accept our apologies: we’ve had to temporarily remove ‘The Burghers of Calais’ from the garden of the Rodin Museum while it undergoes a conservation treatment. The Burghers will return this December!

philamuseum:

Please accept our apologies: we’ve had to temporarily remove ‘The Burghers of Calais’ from the garden of the Rodin Museum while it undergoes a conservation treatment. The Burghers will return this December!

alexaholland:

Be Careful  - July 2012

alexaholland:

Be Careful  - July 2012

mapsinchoate:

Semâ Bekirovic, The Shallow Depths
mythologyofblue

mapsinchoate:

Semâ Bekirovic,

mythologyofblue

bienenkiste:


Horse paper sculptures by Anna-Wili Highfield for Hermès

bienenkiste:

Horse paper sculptures by Anna-Wili Highfield for Hermès

laughingsquid:

Ninja Throwing Slice, Real Pepperoni Pizza Encased in Clear Lucite
iheartmyart:

Alan Belcher
Exhibition 25 Years of Talent at Marianne Boesky, New York, May 2 – June 16, 2012 Curated By: Michelle Grabner

iheartmyart:

Alan Belcher

Exhibition 25 Years of Talent at Marianne Boesky, New York, May 2 – June 16, 2012 Curated By: Michelle Grabner

myampgoesto11:

Hand-cut mylar artwork by Imi Hwangbo

photos: Michael McKelvey

warbyparker:

Giant sculptures of everyday objects



i remember the clothespin from my time in philly.

warbyparker:

Giant sculptures of everyday objects

i remember the clothespin from my time in philly.

littlemissartypants:


Tim Hawkinson, Bear. 2005.
“For the Stuart Collection, Tim imagined a bear constructed of boulders. Eight granite stones - torso, head, ears, arms, and legs - were found locally.  Together they make a bear 23’6” feet high with a total weight of 180 tons. Bear sits in the spacious Academic Courtyard formed by three signature engineering buildings: Atkinson Hall of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, the Computer Science and Engineering Building, and the Powell-Focht Bioengineering Hall.  First proposed in 2001, assembly of the sculpture took place onsite in May 2005 and the landscaping was completed in November 2005.  Bear looks simple but was a sophisticated transportation and engineering feat. The process of placing and securing the boulders together was complex and unusual - actually unknown - in the construction world.” - UCSD’s Stuart Collection
julienfoulatier

littlemissartypants:

Tim Hawkinson, Bear. 2005.

“For the Stuart Collection, Tim imagined a bear constructed of boulders. Eight granite stones - torso, head, ears, arms, and legs - were found locally.  Together they make a bear 23’6” feet high with a total weight of 180 tons. Bear sits in the spacious Academic Courtyard formed by three signature engineering buildings: Atkinson Hall of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, the Computer Science and Engineering Building, and the Powell-Focht Bioengineering Hall.  First proposed in 2001, assembly of the sculpture took place onsite in May 2005 and the landscaping was completed in November 2005.  Bear looks simple but was a sophisticated transportation and engineering feat. The process of placing and securing the boulders together was complex and unusual - actually unknown - in the construction world.” - UCSD’s Stuart Collection

julienfoulatier

keenpeach:

25 abandoned Yugoslavia monuments that look like they’re from the future

“These structures were commissioned by former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito in the 1960s and 70s to commemorate sites where WWII battles took place or where concentration camps stood. They were designed by different sculptors and architects, conveying powerful visual impact to show the confidence and strength of the Socialist Republic. In the 1980s, these monuments attracted millions of visitors per year, especially young pioneers for their ‘patriotic education.’ After the Republic dissolved in early 1990s, they were completely abandoned, and their symbolic meanings were forever lost. From 2006 to 2009, Kempenaers toured around the ex-Yugoslavia region with the help of a 1975 map of memorials, bringing before our eyes a series of melancholy yet striking images.”